What She Said Radio, Toronto, Canada (2016): Click play below to listen to my 13-minute interview with Kris Abel of What She Said talk radio about my experience as a Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner, my year hanging out with meerkats, my work in Gorongosa National Park, and why there are so few women in wildlife photography. It was good fun!


Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Natural History Museum, London (2016): London's Natural History Museum (left, above and below) and National Geographic's Bertie Gregory (right) interviewed me about conservation photography at the 2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year awards ceremony. I was there as one of the 100 finalists out of 50,000 entries for my photo "The Collaborators" (below), an image of a researcher at the Kalahari Meerkat Project, which earned an honor in the Wildlife Photojournalism category.

 

The photo that earned me a spot in the winners' gallery of the 2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition. "The Collaborators", WPY Wildlife Photojournalism finalist.


National Geographic Adventure (2016): NG Adventure named me one of their "20 Under 30: The Next Generation of National Park Leaders". Click the image below to access the article!


National Geographic (2015): National Geographic interviewed me in late 2015 for the two short videos below. On the left is an "Expedition Raw" video about my work with waterbuck in Gorongosa National Park. On the right is a cheeky "Today I Learned" video explaining why vultures tend to eat carcasses from the rear-end.

NatGeo also wrote an excellent blog to go along with the waterbuck video here, which includes more of my interview.


PBS Television (2015): The incredible PBS documentary series Gorongosa Park: Rebirth of Paradise, aired on September 22nd, 2015. I make a few appearances in Episode 4: Hidden Worlds. Keep an eye on PBS for reruns or buy the whole series online here.


E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation, Gorongosa Field Notes (2015): The EOWBF produced two short videos about my work in 2014. Watch below and check out the rest of the Gorongosa Field Notes series here.

“Most people just see bats as shadows in the dark.” Climbing into abandoned wells and creeping around at night isn’t for the faint of heart, but for scientists who study bats, it’s all in a day’s work. In this episode of "Gorongosa Field Notes," mammalogist Jen Guyton teams up with renowned wildlife photographer Dr. Piotr Naskrecki to capture Gorongosa National Park’s bats in flight.

“We started with 3,500 hippos before the war, now we’re down to 250.” Hippos have a fearsome reputation as the most dangerous animal on the African continent. Less well-known is the essential role they play as ecosystem engineers. In this episode of "Gorongosa Field Notes," mammalogist Jen Guyton sets sail on Lake Urema to better understand the role hippos play in shaping Gorongosa National Park’s wetlands.


HHMI Biointeractive (2015): The Howard Hughes Medical Institute produced a video about our efforts to catalog Gorongosa's biodiversity, including its bats:

Biologists Piotr Naskrecki and Jennifer Guyton identify and record the diversity of species in Gorongosa National Park's Cheringoma Plateau. An important part of the conservation effort in Gorongosa National Park is to identify the species living in the park, to ensure their protection and monitor their recovery.


Our 2015 Science paper "Termite mounds can increase the robustness of dry land ecosystems to climatic change" (PDF) was covered by a few news outlets. Click the icons below.